Top 10 male players with most match wins: Rafael Nadal one win away from 1,000-mark milestone

Tennis Features
Rafael Nadal with French Open trophy

Only three players in Open Era history have racked up more than 1,000 match wins while Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic are the only active players to make the top 10 of male players with most match wins.

Just for interest sake, Andy Murray is the only other current player who features in the top 20 as he is currently in 17th place with 676 wins.

10 Stefan Edberg – 801
The Swede’s career spanned from 1982 until 1996 and during that time he collected 41 singles trophies, won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open all twice and reached the top of the world rankings.

The only blight on Edberg’s CV was that he missed out in the Career Grand Slam as he failed to win the French Open.

9 Andre Agassi – 870
The American, who started playing professionally in 1986 before retiring 20 years later, would probably have been part of the 900-club if he didn’t go through that long slump in the late 90s.

Agassi won 60 singles titles and is one of only five men who have won the Career Grand Slam in the Open Era while he earned $31,152,975 in career-prize money, which puts him eighth in the all-time list.

Andre Agassi 2001 Australian Open champion

8 John McEnroe – 883
It is a bit of a surprise that McEnroe isn’t part of the 900-club, considering the length of his career and the number of titles he won. He went pro in 1978 and played actively in singles until 1994.

As for titles, the seven-time Grand Slam winner has 77 singles trophies to his name, which puts him fifth on the all-time Open Era list.

7 Ilie Nastase – 905
Former world No 1 Nastase won 62 singles titles, including the US Open in 1972 and French Open in 2973, during a career that spanned from 1968 to 1985.

6 Novak Djokovic – 930
The Serb is likely to become a member of the 1,000 club at some point next year, but for now the reigning world No 1 is just outside the top five.

The 17-time Grand Slam winner has 81 ATP Tour singles titles to his name and has accumulated $145,147,979 in career-prize money, which puts him top of the pile.

Novak Djokovic 2020 Australian Open champion

5 Guillermo Vilas – 951
The Argentine competed from 1968 to 1992 and during that time he won 62 singles titles, including two Australian Open titles, one French Open and one US Open trophy.

Villas enjoyed a magical 1977 season when he won 130 matches and won 16 of the 31 tournaments he entered.

4 Rafael Nadal – 999
The Spaniard is just one win away from the magical 1,000 mark and you expect him to reach at least No 3 on the list if he continues to play for a couple more years.

Nadal, of course, has 20 Grand Slam titles to his name, has earned $120,955,904 in career-prize money while his 83.3% win percentage is the highest in the Open Era.

Rafael Nadal with US Open trophy

3 Ivan Lendl – 1068
Lendl became the second member of the 1,000 club after Jimmy Connors. The eight-time Grand Slam winner won 94 career singles titles and spent an incredible 270 weeks atop the world rankings.

He may have had a few more singles wins to his name if he wasn’t forced to retire due to a chronic back problem in 1994.

2 Roger Federer – 1242
The 20 Grand Slam winner is only 32 wins away from equalling Connors’ all-time record, but no one is quite sure how long the Swiss icon will continue to play professional tennis.

Federer, who has 103 singles titles to his name (six behind Connors), is second in the all-time career-prize money list behind Djokovic with $129,946,683.

1 Jimmy Connors – 1274
The American’s career spanned from 1970 until 1996 and, as mentioned above, he won 109 singles titles and spent 268 weeks as the world No 1.

Connors won eight Grand Slam titles with his peak years were from 1974 until 1978 when he reached five consecutive US Open finals and four Wimbledon finals.

Jimmy Connors Wimbledon trophy

His last singles victory came in June 1995 when he beat Martin Sinner at the Halle Open to reach the quarter-final, where he lost to Marc Rosset.

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