The 18 players to finish as ATP year-end No 1 as Novak Djokovic extends his amazing record

Novak Djokovic with year-end No 1 celebrations

There have been 28 players who have reached the pinnacle of the ATP Rankings, with five of the men who have climbed to world No 1 currently active.

With his group stage victory over Holger Rune en route to winning the 2023 ATP Finals in Turin last week, Novak Djokovic secured a record-extending eighth ATP year-end No 1 finish.

Here, we count down the 18 players who have ended a season as world No 1 since the ATP Rankings were introduced in 1973.

18. Carlos Alcaraz

Carlos Alcaraz was the latest player to top the men’s rankings when he became the youngest-ever ATP world No 1 at the age of 19 years, 4 months after his victory at the 2022 US Open.

The 20-year-old Spaniard went on to end his impressive 2022 season as the year-end No 1, becoming the youngest ATP player to achieve this, as he finished on 6,820 points ahead of his compatriot Rafael Nadal at No 2. The two-time Major winner, currently ranked second, has spent 36 weeks at the peak of the rankings.

17. Andy Murray

Andy Murray finished as the year-end No 1 for the only time in his career in 2016 following a stunning season in which he won nine titles and 78 matches.

The Brit, who reached top spot for the first time in November 2016, finished on 12,410 points that year, with his rival Novak Djokovic in second. The three-time Grand Slam titlist has spent 41 weeks as world No 1.

16. Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic has ended a season at the pinnacle of the rankings eight times so far in his career, above: Nadal in 2011, 2018 and 2020, Roger Federer in 2012 and 2014, Murray in 2015, Daniil Medvedev in 2021, and Alcaraz in 2023.

The Serbian first became world No 1 in July 2011 during an incredible season, while his best end-of-season points total is the staggering 16,585 he accrued in his amazing 2015 campaign. The 24-time Major champion has spent a record of 401 weeks at the top of the rankings.

READ MORE: How Novak Djokovic’s incredible 2023 season compares to his 2011 and 2015 achievements

15. Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal is a five-time ATP year-end No 1, having finished ahead of Federer in 2008, 2010 and 2017, and Djokovic in 2013 and 2019.

The Spaniard ascended to the peak of rankings for the first time in August 2008 in the midst of a superb year, with his highest end-of-season points total the 13,030 he earned in 2013. The 22-time Grand Slam winner has occupied the world No 1 position for a total of 209 weeks.

14. Roger Federer

Roger Federer sits level with Nadal on five seasons ended as the world No 1, having finished above Andy Roddick in 2004, Nadal in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009.

The Swiss first reached top spot in the ATP Rankings in February 2004, the first in a series of dominant years, while his highest end-of-season points total was 10,550 in 2009. The 20-time Major champion, who retired in 2022, has spent the second-most weeks as world No 1 with 310.

13. Andy Roddick

Andy Roddick achieved the only year-end No 1 finish of his career in a career-best season in 2003, during which he claimed six ATP titles and won 72 matches.

The American, who became world No 1 for the first time in November 2003, edged second-placed Federer. The 2003 US Open winner, who called time on his career in 2012, was the top-ranked ATP player for a total of 13 weeks.

12. Lleyton Hewitt

Lleyton Hewitt ended two seasons as the world No 1 as he finished back-to-back years on top in 2001 and 2002, when Gustavo Kuerten and Andre Agassi finished No 2 in the respective years.

The Australian, who first reached No 1 in November 2001, won both of his Grand Slam titles during these campaigns: the US Open in 2001 and Wimbledon in 2002. The 42-year-old, who retired from singles in 2016, spent 80 weeks as world No 1.

11. Gustavo Kuerten

Gustavo Kuerten finished as the ATP year-end No 1 for the only time in his career in 2000, a year in which he won one of his three French Open titles, and the ATP Finals.

The Brazilian, who was the top-ranked player for the first time in December 2000, secured five titles overall in 2000 as he edged Marat Safin in second position. The three-time Grand Slam champion, who retired in 2008, was world No 1 for 43 weeks overall.

10. Andre Agassi

Andre Agassi ended a season as the world No 1 for the only time in his career in 1999 – a season in which he claimed five titles and won 63 matches.

The American, who first became the No 1 player in the world in April 1995, won both the French Open and US Open titles in 1999 as he finished above No 2 Yevgeny Kafelnikov. The eight-time Grand Slam titlist, who retired in 2006, was the top-ranked player for 101 weeks.

9. Pete Sampras

Pete Sampras has the second-highest number of years ended as world No 1 with six and achieved this in a record six consecutive seasons, finishing above: Michael Stich in 1993, Agassi in 1994 and 1995, Michael Chang in 1996, Patrick Rafter in 1997, and Marcelo Rios in 1998.

The American, who first reached the world No 1 spot in April 1993, won two Grand Slams in each of his 1993, 1994, 1995 and 1997 seasons, while he claimed one in 1996 and 1998. The 14-time Major champion spent 286 weeks on top of rankings, before retiring in 2003.

8. Jim Courier

Jim Courier achieved the only ATP year-end No 1 finish of his career in 1992 – a year during which he won five titles and 69 matches.

The American, who became world No 1 for the first time in February 1992, claimed the Australian Open and French Open crowns that year as he finished ahead of second-ranked Stefan Edberg. The two-time Grand Slam champion, who retired in 2000, was a world No 1 for 58 weeks.

7. Stefan Edberg

Stefan Edberg finished two years as the top-ranked player in the world as he ended consecutive years as No 1 in 1990 and 1991, when Boris Becker and Courier were the respective No 2 players.

The Swede, who first ascended to the world No 1 ranking in August 1990, won the Wimbledon title in the first season he finished on top and the US Open title in the second. The six-time Major winner, who called time on his career in 1996, spent 72 weeks as the highest-ranked ATP player.

6. Mats Wilander 

Mats Wilander secured the lone year-end No 1 finish of his career in 1988 after a career-best season where he won six titles and 53 matches.

The Swede, who reached the peak of the rankings for the first time in September 1988, claimed the Australian Open, French Open and US Open titles in 1988 as he finished above Ivan Lendl in second. The seven-time Grand Slam winner, who retired in 1996, was world No 1 for a total of 20 weeks.

5. Ivan Lendl

Ivan Lendl ended the season as the top-ranked player on four occasions, finishing above: John McEnroe in 1985, Boris Becker in 1986 and 1989, and Edberg in 1987.

The Czech, a world No 1 for the first time in February 1983, won one Major title in 1985 and 1989, and two in both 1986 and 1987. The eight-time Grand Slam champion, who brought an end to his career in 1994, spent 270 weeks on top of the rankings.

4. John McEnroe

Like Lendl, John McEnroe was a four-time ATP year-end No 1 as he finished four straight years on top, ahead of: Lendl in 1981 and 1983, and Jimmy Connors in 1982 and 1984.

The American, who first became the top-ranked player in March 1980, won two Majors in 1981 and 1984, one in 1983, while he was a Wimbledon runner-up in 1982. The seven-time Major singles champion occupied the world No 1 spot for 170 weeks before retiring in 1994.

3. Bjorn Borg

Bjorn Borg ended two years as the top-ranked player in the world as he finished back-to-back seasons as world No 1 in 1979 and 1980, when Connors and McEnroe were the respective No 2 players.

The Swede, who climbed to the top of the rankings for the first time in August 1977, did the French Open and Wimbledon double in both 1979 and 1980, a feat he also achieved in 1978. The 11-time Grand Slam titlist, who initially retired in 1984 before a comeback in 1993, was a world No 1 for 109 weeks overall.

2. Jimmy Connors

Jimmy Connors was a season-ending No 1 five times as he ended five consecutive years at the peak, above: John Newcombe in 1974, Guillermo Vilas in 1975 and 1977, and Borg in 1976 and 1978.

The American, a world No 1 for the first time in July 1974, won three Majors in 1974, one in 1976 and 1978, and reached three Slam finals in 1975, and two in 1977. The eight-time Grand Slam champion spent 268 weeks on top of the rankings before his retirement in 1996.

1. Ilie Nastase

Nastase was the first ever ATP world No 1, having been in top spot when the initial computer rankings list was published in August 1973.

The Romanian triumphed at the French Open during that season as he finished above second-placed Newcombe in the maiden year-end rankings. The two-time Major winner, who retired in 1985, occupied the world No 1 position for 40 weeks.

READ MORE: The 15 players to finish as WTA year-end No 1 as Iga Swiatek ends second-straight year on top

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